2021 So Far

major mambo


August 14, 2021 at Sperling Vineyards

by Miles Overn

photo review


with Covid still active and new restrictions in place, we are choosing to do mini "photo reviews" for as many shows as we can this year

restrictions limit us to grabbing a few shots during the first 2 or 3 songs and then we need to be on our way

Maggie Cotton | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Maggie Cotton

Trevor Salloum | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Trevor Salloum

All photos copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Stephen Buck | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Stephen Buck

Tricia Dalgleish | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Tricia Dalgleish

Maggie Cotton | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Maggie

Trevor Salloum | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Trevor

Stephen Buck | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Stephen

Patricia Dalgleish | Photo copyright (c) 2021 Miles Overn Photography

Tricia

Local Cuban/Latin group Major Mambo played a pair of sets over at Sperling Vineyards in amongst the vines and under a tent to protect against the summer sun. Wine and music aficionados gathered on lawn chairs they brought along with them and settled in to partake of fine vintages and classic tunes from the storied history of great Latin tunes over time.

Vocalist and hand percussionist Maggie Cotton sang the lead on most of the tunes as she swayed and played to and with the music. Keyboardist Tricia Dalgleish added vocals occasionally but it was her nimble fingers dancing across the keys that were her biggest contribution to the ensemble's sound and performance. Electric bassist Stephen Buck delivered that insistent, on-top-of-the-beat groove and motion that propels this style of music ever forward. Percussionist Trevor Salloum provided the metric under-pinning that all Latin music is based upon.

The clave rhythmic pulses from Cotton's hand percussion, the montunos and deft melody lines from Dalgleish's keys, those always pulsing and pushing bass lines, and the constant weaving of conga patterns underneath it all, transport you to wherever and whenever you have heard and felt this music before in a manner that somehow brings other senses into play. Perhaps more than most genres of music, this style is almost inseparable from a sense of physical geography.

Sperling Vineyards has just started hosting live music events this year, but are delighted with the experiences that have been provided to their patrons so far. This looks to be something that they will be doing on a regualr basis in the years ahead.